Airport Security

04/13/2011

Video of TSA pat down of girl sparks new debate

A Kentucky couple wants the TSA to change how it screens children after their 6-year-old daughter was frisked at the New Orleans airport.

They posted the video on YouTube.  It happened while the family was headed home from a vacation earlier this month.

The girl's father, Todd Drexel, told Good Morning America that Anna was confused by the search and started crying afterward because she thought she'd done something wrong.

In a statement, the Transportation Security Administration says the officer followed proper procedure but that the agency is reviewing its screening policies.

 

What do you think about the screening?  Should the TSA change how it screens children?  Click on comment to add to the discussion.  We may post what you write here or use it on Eyewitness News.

11/22/2010

Shirtless boy searched by TSA agents

A YouTube video showing a shirtless young boy resisting a pat-down at Salt Lake City's airport is renewing criticism of search methods for travelers.  Eyewitness News wants to know what you think.  Send in your comments (by clicking below) and your comments could end up on Eyewitness News.

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11/15/2010

Airport Security vs. Privacy

A man who refused a body scan and pat-down search at a San Diego airport has become an Internet sensation in the debate weighing fliers' security versus their privacy.

On his blog, John Tyner wrote about and posted a cell phone audio recording of his half-hour encounter Saturday at Lindbergh Field.

He refused a full-body scan and wouldn't allow a Transportation Security Administration worker to conduct a groin check. Tyner tells the worker, "If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested."

The dispute that followed included police escorting him from the screening area and a supervisor saying he could face a civil lawsuit.

"Advanced imaging technology screening is optional for all passengers," TSA said in a statement released Monday. "Passengers who opt out of [advanced imaging] screening will receive alternative screening, including a physical pat-down."

But anyone who refuses to complete the screening process will be denied access to airport secure areas and could be subject to civil penalties, the administration said, citing a federal appeals court ruling in support of the rule.

What do you think of airport security?  Does it go too far or does it go far enough?  Offer your thoughts by clicking on comment below.  We may use what you write here or on Eyewitness News.